Oh, Jil

I’m of the firm belief that, regardless of any social stigmas attached to the likes office dresses with clacking kitten wedges, or perhaps accidental Asian hipsters, there is a way of taking inspiration from everyday subway-riders and parade it on the hottest day of the year.

Somebody once told me that once I started wearing nail polish on a regular basis, I’d know that I’d become vain. Last week, while getting a mani-pedi, the Dutch beauty beside me declared over the phone that she found blazers and midi-skirts “so corporate and stuffy”. Two days ago, New York was the stuffiest I have ever felt it to be – and here I was, thinking that it had been at its height of suffocation the last time I was in town.

DSC_5506

Lo and behold: Margaret is vain, corporate, and stuffy.

I say that in the most humorous self-depreciation. I’m of the firm belief that, regardless of any social stigmas attached to the likes office dresses with clacking kitten wedges, or perhaps accidental Asian hipsters, there is a way of taking inspiration from everyday subway-riders and parade it on the hottest day of the year. Normcore is a neon signposted example of this upward filtering of retail trends, and our corporate dressing, here, is nothing different. Jil Sander doesn’t dictate what you wear in the office, Human Resources does, and they think Jil Sander is a fancy donut store on the Upper East Side. We’re definitely working from the ground up.

The driving force to restyling any real street look is to choose two elements of each garment, and change it drastically. Instead of nasty tweeds and wools, a blazer should be a softer silk or polyester, perhaps cuffed sleeves for that dreaded sports luxe element, or a pinstripe to acknowledge the great things your Grandfather has done for your character. Whatever you do, your shirting cannot and will not be of the same fabrication. This Dion Lee affair has open sleeves that you can button around your wrists as wings, or leave at ease as avant garde body curtains – the latter of which serves a dual purpose of reducing the bulk of wide hips. With these humble beginnings in place, it is only natural that your skirt would be high-waisted and trumpeted and the most exquisite bottle green. Add a bag that should have a leash, and glasses that should have wings, and you’ll be the vain, stuffy, glamazon you’ve always wanted to be.

Next minute, it’s 1AM, I have an assignment to write, and shows in the morning. Over and out.

Tibi Pinstripe Blazer

Dion Lee Shirt

Jil Sander Sabbia Open Weave Wool Skirt

Elizabeth and James Bag

Illesteva Claire Cat-Eye Sunglasses

Mode Collective Heels

About

Margaret Zhang 章凝 is an Australian-born-Chinese director, photographer, consultant and writer based between New York and Shanghai. Since establishing her website in 2009, Margaret has gone on to work with global brands including CHANEL, UNIQLO, Swarovski, YEEZY, Bulgari, Gucci, MATCHES, Under Armour, and Louis Vuitton in a wide range of capacities both in front of and behind the camera, while completing her Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Laws at The University of Sydney. Margaret’s directing, photography, and styling has been employed by the likes of VOGUE, L’Officiel, Harper’s BAZAAR, NYLON, Marie Claire, GRAZIA and ELLE internationally. She has been listed in Forbes Asia’s 30Under30 and TimeOut’s 40Under40, and her work has been recognized as shaping the international fashion industry by the Business of Fashion BoF500 Index for the past four consecutive years. She went on to be the first Asian face to cover ELLE Australia. In 2016, she co-founded BACKGROUND, a global consultancy for which she specialises in Western-to-Chinese and Chinese-to-Western cultural bridging for a range of luxury, lifestyle, and brand initiatives. In 2017, she exhibited a series of 39 unseen photographic works as a solo show in Sydney, and premiered her first short film – a 15-minute exploration of her visceral relationship with classical music on both performance and abstract planes – to critical acclaim.

For project enquiries Tess.Stillwell@img.com
General enquiries bookings@margaretzhang.com.au