Bunifaziu

In which I wear my shirt… as a hat. Among other things.

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Bonifacio was, by far, my favourite part of Corsica. Frankly, most port towns totally suck in the same way in which mining towns, say, are transitory and strangely void of personality. Bonifacio did not suck. In fact, within the first twenty minutes of being there, the main boardwalk had already far exceeded my wildest impressions of Nice (a grand achievement – you know how much I love Nice). And when the water surrounding super-yacht and tired ferry moorings alike are this blue, you know that a day trip out beyond the protective cliffs will most likely be heavenly. Heaven, even.

Heaven, indeed.

At this particular bikini-clad point in time, Alex and I had just hopped off our boat back from a very real day trip to Heaven (otherwise known as Îles de Lavezzi – more on the most outstanding island experience of my life later), the sun was yet to start that plummeting descent it seems to enjoy around European Summer, and the commercial strip by the water was strangely quiet, but for local potbellies sharing a smoke and the odd pair of bronzed Corsican teens, somehow observing the ‘aliens’ with a blasé curiosity that only they can achieve.

Certainly, it was still too stifling hot for vacationers to tackle even the easy breezy beach dress boutiques, let alone the steep climb up to haute ville.

Having essentially climbed out of the ocean and onto the boat back from the islands, I was too terrified of the effects of sea salt on silk to put my shirt on, so fashioned it the only way I knew how for an all-essential hands-free ride home (that is, for Instagram… and being Usain Bolt). I ended up using the same knotted technique a whole lot to cover my hair in Morocco, so, though not quite as sophisticated as my poolside Phuket affair, there is some method to this madness.

I’ll be sure to post some of my Bonifacienne suggestions tomorrow. One thing I would suggest before then, though, is to get yourself there ASAP – the world is catching on, and tourism as we know it is one of those wonderful, wonderful curses.

Equipment Sailboat Shirt as a turban – Seafolly Bikini – Nobody Shorts

About

Margaret Zhang is a Chinese-Australian photographer, director, stylist and writer based in New York. Since her digital beginnings in the fashion industry in 2009, Margaret has worked with global brands including Chanel, UNIQLO, Swarovski, YEEZY, Clinique, Lexus, Dior, Gucci, Matches and Louis Vuitton in a wide range of capacities both in front of and behind the camera, while completing her Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Laws at The University of Sydney.
Though regularly featured in print and digital media as a model and personality alike, Margaret’s pho tography, styling, and creative direction has been employed by the likes of Vogue, L’Officiel, Harper’s BAZAAR, NYLON, Marie Claire, Buro24/7, and ELLE internationally. She has been listed in Forbes Asia’s 30Under30 and TimeOut’s 40Under40 lists, and her work has been recognised as shaping the international fashion industry by the Business of Fashion BoF500 Index, and ELLE Magazine’s Best Digital Influencer of The Year Award.

 

 

 

For project enquiries Tess.Stillwell@img.com
General enquiries bookings@margaretzhang.com.au